FRC Game and Team Event History

Team 102 has been competing in the FIRST Robotics Competition (which started in 1992) since 1998. We’ve competed in over 25 seasons, attending over 60 official events. You can see an up-to-date list of attended events by Team 102 on the FIRST website.

2022: RAPID REACT

RAPID REACT is played by two alliances of three teams each, with each team controlling a robot and completing specific actions in order to score points. The game revolves around both alliances shooting inflatable balls known as Cargo into a central Hub and climbing within their Hangars at the end of the match.

2021: INFINITE RECHARGE At Home

2021 had the same game as 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but a set of challenges to complete “at-home” were created.

Off-Season Events

2020: INFINITE RECHARGE

In INFINITE RECHARGE, two Alliances work to protect FIRST City from approaching asteroids caused by a distant space skirmish. Each Alliance, along with their trusty droids, race to collect and score Power Cells in order to energize their Shield Generator for maximum protection. To activate Stages of the Shield Generator, droids manipulate their Control Panels after scoring a specific number of Power Cells. Near the end of the match, droids race to their Rendezvous Point to get their Shield Generator operational in order to protect the city!

2019: DESTINATION: DEEP SPACE

In DESTINATION: DEEP SPACE, Presented by The Boeing Company, we join two competing alliances collecting samples on planet Primus. Unpredictable terrain and weather patterns make remote robot operation essential to their mission on the planet. With only 2:30 until liftoff, the alliances must gather as many cargo pods as possible and prepare their spaceships before the next sandstorm arrives.

Off-Season Events

2018: FIRST POWER UP

FIRST POWER UP, the 2018 FIRST Robotics Competition game, finds our teams trapped in an 8-bit video game! Teams use power cubes to defeat the boss. Each three-team alliance has three ways to help defeat the boss: Owning the scale or their switch. Ownership occurs when the scale or alliance’s switch is tipped in their favor. Robots collect and deliver power cubes to gain ownership. Playing power ups. Alliances exchange power cubes for power ups. Power ups provide a timed advantage during the match. There are three power ups that can be played: Force, Boost, and Levitate. Climbing the scale tower. Robots work together to climb the scale tower to face the boss.

Off-Season Events

2017: FIRST STEAMworks

FIRST STEAMWORKS, the 2017 FIRST Robotics Competition game, invites two adventure clubs from an era in which technology relied on steam power to prepare their airships for the ultimate long distance race. Each three-team alliance prepares to take flight in three ways: Build Steam Pressure. Robots collect fuel represented by green balls. They score it in high and low goals in their boiler. As fuel is scored steam pressure in the tank on the alliance’s airship builds – the high goal builds pressure faster than the low goal. Start Rotors. Robots retrieve and deliver gears to pilots on their airship who then install them on the appropriate rotor. Once a gear train is complete the rotor can be started. Prepare for Flight. Adventure clubs want their robots to climb aboard their airships so they can assist the pilots during the race.

Off-Season Events

2016: FIRST STRONGHOLD

In FIRST STRONGHOLD, two Alliances of three robots each are on a Quest to breach their opponents’ fortifications, weaken their tower with boulders, and capture the opposing tower. Robots score points by breaching opponents’ defenses and scoring boulders through goals in the opposing tower. During the final 20 seconds of the Quest, robots may surround and scale the opposing tower to capture it.

Off-Season Events

  • MidKnight Mayhem IV

2015: RECYCLE RUSH

RECYCLE RUSHSM is a recycling-themed game played by two Alliances of three robots each. Robots score points by stacking totes on scoring platforms, capping those stacks with recycling containers, and properly disposing of pool noodles, representing litter. In keeping with the recycling theme of the game, all game pieces used are reusable or recyclable by teams in their home locations or by FIRST at the end of the season.

2014: AERIAL ASSIST

AERIAL ASSIST is played by two competing Alliances of three robots each on a flat field, straddled by a truss suspended just over five feet above the floor. The objective is to score as many balls in goals as possible during a two (2)-minute and 30-second match. The more Alliances score their ball in their goals, and the more they work together to do it, the more points their Alliance receives.

2013: ULTIMATE ASCENT

ULTIMATE ASCENT is played by two competing alliances. Each Alliance consists of three robots, and they compete to score as many discs into their goals as they can during a two (2)-minute and fifteen (15)-second match. The higher the goal in which the disc is scored, the more points the Alliance receives.

Off-Season Events

2012: Rebound Rumble

Rebound Rumble is played by two competing Alliances. Each Alliance consists of three robots. They compete to score as many basketballs into their hoops as they can during a 2 minute and 15 second match. The higher the hoop in which the basketball is scored, the more points the Alliance receives.

2011: LOGO MOTION

LOGO MOTION is played by two competing alliances. Each alliance consists of three robots. They compete to hang as many inflated plastic shapes (triangles, circles, and squares) on their grids as they can during a 2 minute and 15 second match. The higher the teams hang their game pieces on their scoring grid, the more points their alliance receives.

2010: BREAKAWAY

BREAKAWAY is played by two alliances of three teams on a field with bumps, attempting to earn points by collecting soccer balls in goals. Additional bonus points are earned for each robot suspended in air and not touching the field at the end of the match.

2009: LUNACY

In LUNACY, robots are designed to pick up 9″ game balls and score them in trailers hitched to their opponents’ robots for points during a 2 minute and 15 second match. Additional points are awarded for scoring a special game ball, the Super Cell, in the opponent’s trailers during the last 20 seconds of the match. LUNACY is played on a low-friction floor, which means teams must contend with the laws of physics.

2008: FIRST Overdrive

In FIRST Overdrive, students’ robots are designed to race around a track knocking down 40″ inflated Trackballs and moving them around the track, passing them either over or under a 6’6″ overpass. Extra points are scored by robots positioning the Trackballs back on the overpass before the end of the 2 minute and 15 second match.

Off-Season Events

2007: Rack ‘N’ Roll

In Rack ‘N’ Roll, students’ robots are designed to hang inflated colored tubes on pegs configured in rows and columns on a 10-foot high center “rack” structure. Extra points are scored by robots being in their home zone and lifted more than 4″ off the floor by another robot before the end of the 2 minute and 15 second match.

2006: Aim High

In Aim High, students’ robots are designed to launch balls into goals while human players enter balls into play and score points by throwing/pushing balls into corner goals. Extra points are scored by robots racing back to their end zones and climbing the ramp to the platform before the end of the 2 minute and 10 second match.

2005: Triple Play

Triple Play is played on a playing field with the 9 goals configured in 3 x 3 matrix, similar to tic-tac-toe. The robots will attempt to place the red and blue game tetras in or on one or more of the nine goals to score points and “claim ownership” of the goals.

2004: FIRST Frenzy: Raising the Bar

FIRST Frenzy requires robots to collect and pass 13″ balls to the human player to then shoot them into fixed and moveable goals. There are three 30″ balls on the playing field that can be placed on top of any goal by a robot, which will double the point value in the goal. Additionally, robots may attempt to hang from a 10′ bar.

2003: Stack Attack

Stack Attack requires robots to collect and stack plastic storage containers on their side of the playing field. The location of the robots and containers and the height of the stacks at the end of the match determine each team’s score for the round.

2002: Zone Zeal

Each 2 minute match begins with the field broken up into 5 zones and set up as follows. Four robots start on the playing field and are paired in alliances of 2. There are 2 robots at diagonally opposite corners, 10 soccer balls in each driver station area, 20 soccer balls centered along each side of the field, and 3 moveable goals weighing approximately 130 lbs each in the center zone. The strategies are endless, but the basic objectives are simple. Robots race around the playing field trying to gather balls, place them into goals, place the goals in their scoring zone, and return their robot to their starting zone before the 2 minutes have elapsed.

2001: Diabolical Dynamics

Four teams work together as one alliance to try to achieve as high a score as possible in each match. Points are scored by placing balls in their goal, and by positioning their robots and goals in designated areas at the end of each match. At the start of each match, the alliance station contains twenty small balls.In addition there are twenty small balls and four large balls on the far side of the field which may be used to score points. At the end of the two minute match, points are awarded as follows: the alliance will receive one point for each small ball in the goal and not in contact with a robot, and ten points for each large ball in the goal and not in contact with a robot. Each alliance will receive ten points for each robot that is in the End Zone. An additional ten points will be added if the stretcher is in the End Zone. The alliance doubles its score if the bridge is balanced. The alliance multiplies its score by a factor of up to three by ending the match before the two minute time limit. Each team receives the alliance score. A team multiplies its’ score by 1.1 if its large ball is on top of a goal. Scores are rounded up to the nearest whole point after applying all applicable multipliers.

2000: Co-Opertition FIRST

Four teams, paired in two alliances, will compete in each match. An alliance scores points by placing balls in their goal, and by positioning their robots in designated areas at the end of each match. At the start of a match each alliance has seven yellow balls and one black ball in their station. In addition, there are fifteen yellow balls and two black balls on the far side of the field which may be scored by either alliance.

1999: Double Trouble

Points are scored by positioning “floppies,” robots, and the “puck” on the playing field. Floppies are lightweight, pillow-like objects with Velcro-loop material located in the center and around the perimeter. Each alliance has ten color coded floppies located on the playing field and at the player stations. At the end of each two minute match, points are awarded as follows: Each two-team alliance will receive one point for each of its floppies that is at least 2” over and not touching the playing field surface, and less than eight feet above the surface if the playing field. Each alliance will receive three points for each of its floppies eight feet or higher over the surface of the playing field. Any robot that climbs onto the puck will multiply its alliance’s score by three.

1998: Ladder Logic

Ladder Logic was Team 102’s rookie year.

In two minute matches, the three robots and human players score points by placing the balls onto the side goals or into the central goal. The balls are color-coded to identify team ownership. A human player, located outside the perimeter of the field, is allowed to hand balls to the robot or throw balls directly at the goals.

1997: Toroid Terror

In two minute matches, the three robots and human players score points by placing the inner tubes onto pegs in the goal, or around the top of the goal. The tubes are color coded to identify team ownership. Human players are not allowed onto the field, but they may hand tubes to the robots or throw tubes directly onto the goal.

1996: Hexagon Havoc

In two minute matches, the three robots, with their human partners, score points by placing the balls in the central goal. The balls may be carried, pushed or thrown into the goal by the robots. The human players are not allowed on the playing field as they are seat-belted down at their stations, but they may score points by throwing ball(s) into the central goal. Points are awarded for balls located in the central goal at the conclusion of each two minute match.

1995: Ramp N’ Roll

In two minute matches, three robots race down a 30-foot raceway, over a speed bump just wide enough for two to pass through, to retrieve their 24″ and 30″ vinyl balls. To score, they must carry the ball(s) back up the raceway and push or shoot the ball over a nine-foot field goal from either the playing floor or a raised platform area, all the while trying to keep their opponents from scoring. Teams may score more than once with each ball – the smaller ball is worth two points and the larger ball is worth three points.

1994: Tower Power

Contestants attempt to place as many of their soccer balls possible inside one of two goals. In each match, three-team alliances compete to place 12 balls of their team color inside either the high goal, worth 3 points, or in the low goal, worth one point per ball. The winner is the team that has the highest total point value of soccer balls within the two goals at the end of the two minute match. In the case of a
tie, the team with more balls in the upper goal wins.

1993: Rug Race

Contestants attempt to collect balls from either the playing field or their opponents’ goals, place them in their own goals, and defend them. There are five large air-filled kick balls each worth five points, and twenty smaller water-filled balls worth one point each. The winner is the team with the highest total point value of balls within their foal at the conclusion of a two minute match. In the case of a tie, the team with the most large balls wins. If still a tie, the team which collected their balls first wins.

1992: Maize Craze

Four contestants compete in a round to see who can collect the highest point value total of tennis balls, return to home base, and defend their cache successfully. Each round is two minutes long. The game is played on a 16′ X 16′ square playing arena covered with a 1-1/2″ layer of whole corn kernels.